Federal Government Announces $925 Million Leaving Violence Program 

Domestic violence
Victim-survivors of domestic violence will soon receive $5,000 payments to access when fleeing a violent partner, as part of the federal government's Leaving Violence Program.

Federal Government Announces $925 Million Leaving Violence Program 

Victim-survivors of domestic violence will soon receive $5,000 payments to access when fleeing a violent partner, as part of the federal government's Leaving Violence Program.
Domestic violence
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Violence against women is a “national crisis” that needs to be addressed as a country, Prime Minister Anthony Albanese declared on Wednesday, while unveiling new measures to form part of his government’s response. 

“When, on average, one woman loses their life every four days, then that represents a crisis that requires action,” Prime Minister Anthony Albanese said. “Violence against women is not a problem women have to solve, it is a national epidemic and we have to take responsibility for addressing it as a nation.”

What is the Leaving Violence Program?

The federal government announced that almost $1 billion — over five years — would go towards permanently establishing a program that victim-survivors of violence could access when fleeing a violent partner. 

“Research has shown us that financial barriers can be a huge impediment to victim-survivors breaking free of a violent relationship and we are determined to reduce those barriers along with providing other supports to assist those fleeing violence,” Minister for Social Services, Amanda Rishworth said.

The Leaving Violence Program will support victim-survivors of intimate partner violence to make informed choices about leaving violent relationships and receive the vital support they need.

The program will provide eligible victim-survivors with an individualised financial support package of up to $1,500 in cash and up to $3,500 in goods and services. As well as safety planning, risk assessment, and referrals to other essential services for up to 12 weeks. The payment amount will also be indexed annually to keep in pace with the rising cost of living, ensuring recipients are given the best support when leaving violent relationships.

The Leaving Violence Program will commence in mid-2025

The program is set to commence in mid-2025, following the procurement of an appropriate service provider with family, domestic and sexual violence experience, and the transition of the existing pilots into the program.

This commitment builds on a record $2.3 billion in measures put in place by the Albanese Government to help address violence against women.

Supporting victims of intimate partner violence

“We need persistent, consistent and unified action on this issue in order to create real change and this investment will mean there is a permanent lifeline for those people experiencing intimate partner violence,” Rishworth said.

“The heartbreaking reality is that there is no overnight solution to violence against women and children,” Albanese said. “My Government is absolutely committed to making progress to end family, domestic and sexual violence in one generation through our National Plan.”

“Today’s announcement builds on our efforts to ensure fewer women feel trapped in a violent relationship because they don’t know if they can afford to leave,” Albanese said.

Help is available

If you or someone you know is experiencing, or at risk of experiencing, domestic, family or sexual violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732, chat online via the website, or text 0458 737 732.

If you are concerned about your behaviour or use of violence, you can contact the Men’s Referral Service on 1300 766 491 or visit the No to Violence website.

Featured image: Ben White